ravendroppings
wingedtoad:

from tabletopwhale

Check out these amazing bird flight motion patterns.   I love this stuff.  It’s interesting that the shorter winged moth and hummingbird have similar motion, while the goose and bat are also similar.   The dragonfly just makes my brain stutter, too much going on at once. Just checked my package tracking infos for the day and the Clockwork Bird castings are out for delivery!  ~flails~   So excited to try out lots of colors on those guys! 

wingedtoad:

from tabletopwhale

Check out these amazing bird flight motion patterns.   I love this stuff.  It’s interesting that the shorter winged moth and hummingbird have similar motion, while the goose and bat are also similar.   The dragonfly just makes my brain stutter, too much going on at once. 

Just checked my package tracking infos for the day and the Clockwork Bird castings are out for delivery!  ~flails~   So excited to try out lots of colors on those guys! 

ursulavernon

The male teacock’s extravagant handles evolved to attract the attention of the drabber-colored teahen. The males with the largest, glossiest, and most brilliantly colored handles will attract a small harem of females. Males compete only by display, and will not engage in actual battle for fear of chipping. 
The downside to the spectacular display by the males is that lugging around such a weight of crockery makes them more vulnerable to predators, particularly the aquatic crockpotodile, the teacock’s chief predator. - Ursula Vernon

This makes my weird little heart SO FREAKIN HAPPY!

The male teacock’s extravagant handles evolved to attract the attention of the drabber-colored teahen. The males with the largest, glossiest, and most brilliantly colored handles will attract a small harem of females. Males compete only by display, and will not engage in actual battle for fear of chipping. 

The downside to the spectacular display by the males is that lugging around such a weight of crockery makes them more vulnerable to predators, particularly the aquatic crockpotodile, the teacock’s chief predator. - Ursula Vernon

This makes my weird little heart SO FREAKIN HAPPY!